Ulrich Seidl, Paradise: Love, 2012, color film in 35 mm, 120 minutes. Production still.

“I RETWEETED YOUR TWEET,” said an American reporter to a British colleague behind me in antsy press scrum this morning. In response to Ulrich Seidl’s Competition entry Paradise: Love, about a fifty-year-old Austrian woman named Teresa (played by Margarethe Tiesel) on a sex holiday in Kenya, the female UK correspondent had apparently typed, “It made me ashamed to be European.”

That analysis, even at fewer than 140 characters, may not have been the most sophisticated, but the film itself was hardly more complex. Vienna-based Seidl, an equal-opportunity misanthrope known for documentary-fiction hybrids that he has likened to “staged reality,” explores the not especially original question of who is exploiting whom. (For what it’s worth, Paradise: Love treats the topic more intelligently than Laurent Cantet’s similarly themed, Haiti-set Heading South from 2005.) As they waddle along the sand, Teresa and the other middle-aged, corpulent Austrian women she befriends on her vacation cackle among themselves over their racist remarks (they refer to the Kenyan men they meet as “beasts,” “shiny as bacon rind,” or “difficult to tell apart”). The young African beach vendors who sell tchotchkes and their bodies to white women—and who are played in Seidl’s film by nonprofessional actors with firsthand knowledge of the trade—charm these fleshy, pasty Frauen by making them feel desirable, a service that’s eventually followed by importunate demands for cash. And so Paradise: Love proceeds: a protracted cycle of mutual postcolonial debasement.

Another Palme d’Or contender, Matteo Garrone’s Reality, also highlighted sky-high BMI in the euro zone. Gregarious Neapolitan fishmonger and part-time scammer Luciano (Aniello Arena) is urged by his family—a clan that includes several fatties—to try out for Big Brother. After traveling to Rome to audition for the show at Cinecittŕ, Luciano becomes increasingly consumed with making the final cut. “I feel like I’ve seen that movie before,” a colleague observed on the Rue d’Antibes after the screening. Indeed, Reality recalls not only other satires about simpletons desperate for stardom, like Visconti’s Bellissima (1951) and Scorsese’s The King of Comedy (1983), but also Erik Gandini’s 2009 documentary on the Italian obsession for stardom, Videocracy. Though Garrone’s project may not be sui generis, occasional sharp touches—such as the recurrence of a Grande Fratello alum who stirs crowds into a frenzy with his English tagline, “Never give up!”—enliven a sometimes monotonous comedy. If nothing else, the film mirrors the distorted reality I’ll be living in for the next ten days.

Melissa Anderson