U.S. Museum Exhibitions

The following guide to museum shows currently on view is compiled from Artforum’s three-times-yearly exhibition preview. Subscribe now to begin a year of Artforum—the world’s leading magazine of contemporary art. You’ll get all three big preview issues, featuring Artforum’s comprehensive advance roundups of the shows to see each season around the globe.

David Hammons, Time Out (Basketball Drawing) (detail), 2004/2010, graphite on paper with alarm clock, 44 x 28 3/4 x 6".

Yves Klein/David Hammons

ASPEN ART MUSEUM
ASPEN, CO
Through November 30
Curated by Heidi Zuckerman Jacobson

Nouveau Réaliste Yves Klein was notorious in the 1960s for using women as “human paintbrushes,” while American Conceptualist David Hammons gained renown a decade later for indexical drawings made using his own greased-up body. Though the two artists’ practices emerged from vastly different contexts and conversations, this exhibition—one of several inaugurating the AAM’s new downtown venue—contends that an irreverent attitude toward artmaking connects Klein and Hammons in intriguing ways. Three themes, “Ritual,” “Process,” and “Transformation,” promise to link the show’s forty-nine works on more than just formal grounds, hopefully allowing ephemeral actions like Klein’s Zones of immaterial pictorial sensibility, 1962—in which a notional artwork was transferred to its collector via a ceremonial toss of gold into the Seine—and Hammons’s sidewalk sale of melting snowballs (Bliz-aard Ball Sale, 1983) to be productively regarded together. A catalogue with contributions by Jacobson, Philippe Vergne, and Klaus Ottmann accompanies the show.

Elizabeth Mangini

“Carl Andre: Sculpture as Place, 1958–2010”

DIA:BEACON
BEACON, NY
Through March 2 2015
Curated by Yasmil Raymond and Philippe Vergne

In Carl Andre’s own telling, his sculpture has occupied three distinct phases: “sculpture as form” (the carved beams of 1958–59), “sculpture as structure” (the stacked constructions of 1959–65), and “sculpture as place” (the horizontal arrangements of bricks and metal plates of 1966–2010 for which he is best known). This long-awaited retrospective, the artist’s first in the US in more than thirty years, aims to trace the contours of these developments with some fifty works produced between the late 1950s and early 2000s. Yet the show promises much more: Accompanied by a scholarly catalogue, it will feature roughly 165 of Andre’s concrete poems, as well as a selection of his little-known “Dada Forgeries”—“minor” pun-infused readymades largely inspired by Duchamp, an artist Andre once declared himself against.

Travels to Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, May 7–Oct. 12, 2015; Hamburger Bahnhof—Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin, May 7–Sept. 25, 2016; Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Oct. 20, 2016–Feb. 12, 2017.

James Meyer

“Covert Operations: Investigating the Known Unknowns”

SCOTTSDALE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART
SCOTTSDALE, AZ
Through January 11 2015
Curated by Claire C. Carter

The Donald Rumsfeld Scale of epistemology, established post-9/11, famously stretches from “known knowns” to “unknown unknowns.” “Known unknowns,” however, occupy the median zone of well-founded anxiety brought on not by being “in possession of all the facts”—the condition of paranoia as wryly defined by William S. Burroughs—but by having enough of them to extrapolate that grim details have yet to emerge about, say, “black ops,” human-rights violations, illegal extradition, and human trafficking. Here, thirteen artists and collaboratives (including Taryn Simon, Harun Farocki, Kerry Tribe, Jenny Holzer, and Trevor Paglen), exploiting the Freedom of Information Act, government archives, and “insider connections,” respond to the US government’s cloud of unknowing via strategies ranging from evidence-driven truth-telling to critical modes that mirror the state’s artfully constructed ambiguities. Travels to the San Jose Museum of Art, CA, Sept.–Dec. 2015.

Martin Herbert