U.S. Museum Exhibitions

The following guide to museum shows currently on view is compiled from Artforum’s three-times-yearly exhibition preview. Subscribe now to begin a year of Artforum—the world’s leading magazine of contemporary art. You’ll get all three big preview issues, featuring Artforum’s comprehensive advance roundups of the shows to see each season around the globe.

Wanda Pimentel, Untitled—Série Envolvimento, 1967, acrylic on canvas, 45 3/4 × 35 1/8". From “International
Pop.”

“International Pop”

WALKER ART CENTER
MINNEAPOLIS
Through September 6
Curated by Darsie Alexander with Bartholomew Ryan

If a select few of Pop art’s past and present stars (think Sigmar Polke and Jeff Koons) recently took New York, the Walker Art Center’s upcoming exhibition—featuring some 140 works produced over the course of three decades on four continents—aims to widen our Pop horizons far beyond the usual names and locales. Alongside such household brands as Warhol and Rauschenberg, Polke will make an appearance, but so too will his (less recognized) fellow Capitalist Realists Konrad Lueg and Manfred Kuttner, here joined by Argentineans Marta Minujín and Edgardo Giménez, Brazilian Wanda Pimentel, and the Japanese-born Ushio Shinohara and Yayoi Kusama, among many others. Incorporating an extensive film and video program and showcasing works across media, the Walker exhibition and accompanying catalogue promise an unmatched opportunity to assess Pop’s global reach, and (it’s Pop, after all) to see some standout works by a few undisputed stars in the process. Travels to the Dallas Museum of Art, Oct. 11–Jan. 17, 2016; Philadelphia Museum of Art, Feb. 18–May 15, 2016.

Graham Bader

“Barbara Kasten: Stages”

ICA - INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART, PHILADELPHIA
PHILADELPHIA
Through August 16
Curated by Alex Klein

A good survey exhibition is both thoughtful in its assessment of an artist’s contribution and timed to a moment in which the public is primed to consider it. “Barbara Kasten: Stages” promises to be both, as Kasten’s measured engagement with photographic, sculptural, and architectural ideas since the 1970s is an undeniable precedent and prompt for contemporary postdisciplinary art practices. Tracking the artist’s remarkable trajectory through Bauhausian pedagogy and fiber art in the ’60s, the California Light and Space movement in the ’70s, and postmodernism in the ’80s, and culminating with her stellar recent photographs and a site-specific video work, this exhibition animates and provides access to a protean four-decade-long practice. In the accompanying catalogue, the long-underrecognized artist remarks in conversation with artist Liz Deschenes—one of a generation of younger artists influenced by Kasten’s work—that she feels as if she has finally found her peers. A new round of conversations and exchanges is about to begin.

Charlotte Cotton

Cerith Wyn Evans, Things are conspicuous in their absence, 2012, neon, 7 1/2“ × 16' 1”. From “The Blue of Distance.”

“The Blue of Distance”

ASPEN ART MUSEUM
ASPEN, CO
Through June 28
Curated by Courtenay Finn

Blue, writer and historian Rebecca Solnit muses, is the “color of there seen from here, the color of where you are not. And the color of where you can never go.” Indeed, the hue’s synonymy with absence, melancholy, and transcendence is perhaps epitomized by Derek Jarman’s final film, Blue (1993)—its saturated ultramarine projection echoing the filmmaker’s experience of going blind. Lifting its title and marrow from Solnit’s 2008 essay “The Blue of Distance,” this exhibition presents works by nine artists who engage this particular phenomenon of obscuration. From “Untitled (Blue Mirror), 1990, Felix Gonzalez-Torres’s psychoanalytic gesture in the form of minimalist takeaway gazing-pool prints, to Untitled (Roman Note), 1970, Cy Twombly’s inscrutable demonstration in cyan wax crayon and oil of what remains inaccessible to language, the exhibition and accompanying catalogue, with a contribution from poet Anne Carson, seek to articulate what occupies the space between subjects and their objects of desire—that which we’ve deemed blue.

Annie Godfrey Larmon

Spread from Andy Warhol’s A Gold Book, 1957, offset lithographic prints and hand coloring on paper, 14 1/2 × 23". © Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

“Warhol by the Book”

WILLIAMS COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART (WCMA)
WILLIAMSTOWN, MA
Through August 16
Curated by Matt Wrbican

Given the attention afforded every aspect of Andy Warhol’s diverse production and legacy, it is surprising that his engagement with books has taken so long to come to the fore. Like last year’s anthology Reading Andy Warhol: Author Illustrator Publisher, “Warhol by the Book” seeks to rectify this situation, bringing together some four hundred objects associated with more than eighty different books, from faux-naive self-published pre-Pop titles to the fascinatingly dark Andy Warhol’s Index (Book) of 1967, which encapsulates the look and ethos of the Silver Factory at its height. Highlights include the lesser-known 1968 print portfolio Flash—November 22, 1963, the prepublication designer’s dummy and mock-up for the Index (Book), and a diminutive but intriguing Marilyn Monroe Book Maquette, ca. 1968. With no planned catalogue, you will have to get yourself to Williamstown to see these books in person. Travels to the Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, Oct. 9, 2015– Jan. 10, 2016.

Branden W. Joseph

“Come as You Are: Art of the 1990s”

MONTCLAIR ART MUSEUM
MONTCLAIR, NJ
Through May 17
Curated by Alexandra Schwartz

The Guggenheim and the New Museum in New York have both recently examined the art of the 1990s, and “Come as You Are” promises to be a worthwhile expansion of the discussion. Attempting an overview of art production between the fall of the Berlin Wall and 9/11—including some sixty works (paintings, sculptures, prints, videos, and digital art) by forty-five artists ranging from Elizabeth Peyton to Julie Mehretu, Rirkrit Tiravanija to Felix Gonzalez-Torres—the Montclair Art Museum survey will cover all the ’90s basics, such as globalization, digital culture, and contemporary art’s ongoing (and inevitable, necessary) engagement with popular culture. “Come as You Are” is, after all, the title of one of Nirvana’s most famous songs. The comprehensive catalogue includes essays by Huey Copeland, Joan Kee, and others. Travels to the Telfair Museums, Savannah, GA, June 12–Sept. 20; University of Michigan Museum of Art, Ann Arbor, Oct. 17, 2015–Jan. 31, 2016; Blanton Museum of Art, University of Texas at Austin, Feb. 16–May 15, 2016.

David Rimanelli