June 13, 2014

Tiffany Foundation Announces 2013 Grantees

The Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation has announced the recipients of its 2013 Biennial Awards. Administered by Artists Space, New York, the foundation’s biennial competition will award a total of $600,000 to a selection of artists chosen from a pool of 137 nominees working in painting, drawing, sculpture, installation, photography, video, craft, and multimedia. Each winning artist will receive a gift of $20,000. The foundation was established in 1918 and its artist competition in 1980, which has granted $8,534,000 in awards to 441 artists nationwide.

June 13, 2014

Artists Announced for Tenth Gwangju Biennale

The Tenth Gwangju Biennale has announced its roster of participating artists, which includes a total of 105 artists from thirty-six countries, and thirty-five new commissions. Curated by Jessica Morgan, the biennale will feature the work of AA Bronson, Heman Chong, Urs Fischer, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Sharon Hayes, Pierre Huyghe, Lee Bul, Renata Lucas, Stewart Uoo, Liu Xiaodong, and Akram Zaatari, among others. The biennale will be on view from September 5 to November 9, 2014.

June 12, 2014

Amar Kanwar Wins Leonore Annenberg Prize for Art and Social Change

Creative Time today announced that New Delhi-based artist Amar Kanwar has been selected as the winner of the 2014 Leonore Annenberg Prize for Art and Social Change. The prize is designed to recognize artists whose work provokes awareness of and engagement with critical issues of our time. Kanwar will use his prize money of $25,000 to create an installation, The Sovereign Forest, that will comprise moving and still images, texts, books, pamphlets, albums, music, and objects, meant to start a response to our understanding of crime, politics, human rights, and ecology.

June 12, 2014

Tate Receives Gift of Twombly Works Valued at $84 Million

The Tate has received seven works by Cy Twombly that together have been valued by the artist's foundation at approximately eighty-four million dollars. Director Nicolas Serota called it “one of the most generous gifts ever [given] to the Tate by an artist or foundation.” The pieces include three large canvases, all Untitled (Bacchus), created between 2006 and 2008, and five bronze sculptures. The BBC reports that The Tate held a major retrospective of the artist’s work in 2008, three years prior to his death at the age of eighty-three. Nicola Del Roscio, president of the Cy Twombly Foundation said: “On behalf of the foundation, it is my great pleasure to honor Cy's wishes with this gift.”

June 12, 2014

Sylvia L. Yount Named Curator of the American Wing at Metropolitan Museum

Sylvia L. Yount has been named curator of the American Wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Yount is currently chief curator, curator of American art, and department head at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. Yount joined the Virginia institution in 2007, following tenures at the High Museum of Art and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.

Yount takes the post currently held by Morrison H. Heckscher, who has stepped down to become curator emeritus of the American Wing. Heckshecker joined the Metropolitan in 1966 and went on to serve as assistant curator, associate curator, and then curator. He has acted as chairman of the wing since 2001 and was responsible for overseeing its renovation and reinstallation, which was completed in 2012. Said director Thomas Campbell: “Morrie Heckscher has had a long and distinguished career at the Met with many landmark scholarly accomplishments. Perhaps the most significant has been his supervision of the decade-long renovation and reinstallation of the entire American Wing.”

June 11, 2014

Senior Staff Promotions at the Met

Thomas P. Campbell, director and CEO of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, yesterday announced five senior staff promotions: Carrie Rebora Barratt as deputy director for collections and administration; Christine Coulson as chief advisor to the director; Luke Syson as Iris and B. Gerald Cantor chairman of the department of European sculpture and decorative arts; Lisa Pilosi as Sherman Fairchild conservator in charge of the department of objects conservation; and Jeffrey S. Spar as vice president for technology and chief technology officer. The five will begin in their new roles on July 1. “These promotions recognize the creative energy and expertise of five key individuals to the vitality and excellence of this institution,” said Campbell.

June 11, 2014

WSU Museum Gets Over 200 Jim Dine Prints Valued at $2 Million

Artist Jim Dine has donated more than 200 prints to Washington State University’s Museum. The gift is estimated to be nearly $2 million, and will create the largest permanent collection of Dine prints at a university anywhere in the world. Dine chose the university in part to support the efforts of arts patron and philanthropist Jordan D. Schnitzer, who last fall announced his commitment of $5 million to launch the $15 million effort to build a new and larger art museum at WSU. More than $9 million has been pledged to the effort thus far.

June 10, 2014

Collection of Harry Callahan Photos Given to Vancouver Art Gallery

The Montreal-based Rossy Family Foundation has donated a collection of over 550 photographs by Harry Callahan to the Vancouver Art Gallery. This effectively makes the museum the second largest public collection of the artist’s work, which reflects the full range of experimental techniques and approaches the artist employed throughout his sixty-year career. Said director Kathleen S. Bartels: “It is an outstanding addition to the Vancouver Art Gallery’s photography collection, which has grown substantially over the past decade and is now of international importance.” The gallery also recently revealed plans to open its new building, which will be designed by Herzog & de Meuron.

June 10, 2014

Frick Collection Announces Major Expansion

The Frick Collection has announced plans for a major expansion that will include a new six-story wing and a rooftop garden, amounting to sixty thousand square feet of construction. Davis Brody Bond, the architecture firm behind the interior of the new National September 11 Memorial Museum, has been tapped for the design, which will “retain the Beaux-Arts vernacular of the original home and use the same Indiana limestone,” reports Robin Pogrebin of the New York Times. Construction is slated to begin in 2017 and the museum hopes to seek government support.

Museum director Ian Wardropper stated that the Frick’s current spaces are too small to accommodate visitors—annual attendance spiked from approximately 300,000 to 420,000 last year—with lines snaking around corners and waits of, at times, a few hours. “We sell out on a regular basis and have to turn people away,” said Wardropper. The extension will give the Frick 50 percent more space for temporary exhibitions and 24 percent more for its permanent collection of some 1,200 works, by artists like Degas, El Greco, Manet, and Renoir. The new addition will also extend the building to the east—using space currently occupied by a gated garden that is not open to the public—connecting the museum to its art reference library, which is on East Seventy-first Street. The renovation will also include more office space for the full-time staff, which has grown to about 220 from about 160. Museum officials emphasized that this renovation will leave the core experience of visiting the Frick unchanged.